Mutable Instruments

Mutable Instruments

Mutable Instruments Shruti-1 with SM4 filter Assembled

via this auction"What is it?The Shruthi-1 is a hybrid digital/analog monosynth. Its hardware design is deceptively simple, but the sonic range is wide: sometimes grungily digital like a PPG-Wave, fat and funky like a SH-101, videogame-y like a Commodore 64, weird and warm like an ESQ-1 ; but more often than not, truly original.Best of both worldsDigital…An 8-bit microcontroller plays the role of



Pinku

flickr set By mutable.instruments(click for more)"Another Shruthi-1... This time... Pink!"



MIDI connectors

flickr by mutable.instruments(click for more)



Mutable Instruments’ Shruti-1, The Simplest Synth That Could Possibly Rock, Coming Soon

Click here to view the embedded video.
This is the latest demo video of a new DIY synth project currently in development, Mutable Instruments’ Shruti-1.
Description:
The Shruti-1 runs on a modest AVR microcontroller (of Arduino fame), clocked at 16 MHz and providing a whopping 2kb of RAM.
You’re more likely to find this 8-bit wonder in vending machines than in synths… Yet, the Shruti-1’s firmware squeezes the most out of this tight processor to render classic waveforms, but also FM or weird digital sounds – all of them in their full 8-bit quirkiness.
Today’s synths use DSPs or general purpose CPUs to emulate classic analog filters. To color and warm up your sounds, the Shruti-1 directly uses the real thing: a CEM3379 VCF/VCA, belonging to a lineage of chips found in the Prophet VS, Ensoniq ESQ-1 or the Waldorf Microwave.
Mutable says that “There are many cheap DIY noise-makers out there… but how many of them can you really compose melodies on, or use on stage to play sequences with? The Shruti-1 is by contrast a complete MIDI instrument.”



Mutable Instruments Shruti-1

"Old-school technology
Minimalist digital oscillators…

No 800MHz ARM core, Sharc DSP or hardware-accelerated band-limited interpolation here! The Shruti-1 runs on a modest AVR microcontroller (of the Arduino fame) clocked at 16 MHz and providing a whopping 2kb of RAM. You’re more likely to find this 8-bit wonder in vending machines than in synths… Yet, the Shruti-1’s firmware squeezes the most out of this tight processor to render classic waveforms, but also FM or weird digital sounds – all of them in their full 8-bit quirkiness." Full details at Mutable Instruments.






Treat Yourself :)

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